Do You Have a Teen with OCD?

Do you have a teen with OCD?

Launched in 2009 by the International OCD Foundation (IOCDF), OCD Awareness Week takes place annually during the second week in October. OCD stands for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and OCD Week aims to raise awareness and understanding about this condition so that more sufferers can receive appropriate and effective treatment.

What is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?

OCD is a common mental condition. An individual with OCD has constantly recurring thoughts (obsessions) that may lead to behaviors that they have no control over (compulsions). These behaviors will be repeated over and over and the sufferer will be unable to stop. It’s not just about a habit like biting your nails or sometimes thinking negative thoughts. OCD in teens can affect their lives to such an extent that they have trouble living a normal life at home or in school.

What are Examples of OCD Obsessions and Compulsions?

An obsessive individual might be someone who thinks they’ll be unlucky if they don’t put their clothes on in the exact same order every morning. A compulsive habit might be someone washing their hands exactly seven times after touching something dirty. A teen may try to involve family members in their obsessions. For instance, they may insist that their parents and siblings also wash their hands the way they do. Although teens might not want to think or do these things, and may even understand that they don’t make sense, they feel powerless to stop.

How Common is OCD Among Teens?

The International OCD Foundation (IOCD) estimates that approximately twenty teenagers in a large high school may have OCD. Compulsive rituals can be somewhat time-consuming, making teens late for school and activities. When parents try to “reason” a teen out of their compulsive behavior, this results in arguments and tension. Some teens may worry that they’re going crazy and work hard to hide their OCD from others. This prevents them from behaving naturally and causes a great deal of inner stress and exhaustion.

What Causes OCD?

Unfortunately, research has not been able to pinpoint the exact cause or causes of OCD. However, studies have suggested that differences in the brain and genes of those affected may play a role. OCD may result from problems in communication between the front part of the brain and the brain’s deeper structures. These brain structures use a chemical messenger (neurotransmitter) called serotonin. What is known is that, in some sufferers, the brain circuitry involved in OCD becomes more normalized with medications that have an effect on serotonin levels (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SRIs). The same effect has been observed in OCD sufferers undergoing cognitive behavior therapy (CBT).

  • Can OCD be Inherited? – It does seem that OCD can run in families. This backs up the contention that genes are likely playing a partial role in the development of the disorder.

Where can I get Help for my Teen with OCD in Phoenix?

OCD is a type of anxiety disorder. If your teen (aged thirteen to seventeen) has been diagnosed with OCD, they may benefit from joining a Doorways Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for Anxiety Disorders/OCD. A Doorways IOP consists of a small group led by a trained counselor and operates on an open enrollment basis. This means that your teen can be enrolled at any time. We want to help your teen with OCD so contact us for more information.

Doorways is Sponsoring the Iaedp Phoenix Winter Gala

This year, Doorways will be sponsoring the International Association of Eating Disorders professionals Phoenix Winter Gala. The event will take place at the Iaedp Symposium in Palm Desert, California on December 7th and will include various key speakers on all subjects related to eating disorders and being a professional in the industry. More information will be released as the date approaches including the names of the speakers and the schedule for those interested in attending. For more information on the event or about Iaedp in general, please visit their website.

IAEDP Foundation’s Focus:

The International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp™) is well recognized for its excellence in providing first-quality education and high-level training standards to an international multidisciplinary group of various healthcare treatment providers and helping professions, who treat the full spectrum of eating disorder problems.

 

Now Hiring: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner or Psychiatrist

Doorways LLC. is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on 13-25-year olds and their families.

Doorways provides a supportive, family-focused environment, flexible schedule, competitive salary and benefits, and a fun place to work!

Providers at Doorways specialize in treatment for eating disorders, mood disorders, anxiety/OCD, substance abuse, depression, ADD/ADHD, self-harm, suicide prevention, and family counseling.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Certification with current unrestricted license from the Arizona State Board of Nursing or Doctor of Medicine or Osteopathic Medicine with current unrestricted license from the Arizona State Board of Medical Examiners,
  • Current DEA License, NPI Number,
  • Three or more years’ experience in the delivery of mental health treatment for adolescents and young adults,
  • Current CPR & First Aid Certifications
  • Empaneled with at least one major insurance carrier in Arizona preferred.
  • Able to support a faith-based, holistic, integrated model of treatment
  • Energetic and passionate regarding working with the adolescent and young adult population
  • Possess excellent interpersonal skills and the desire to grow with a rapidly expanding practice
  • Team player willing to work with a multidisciplinary team of professionals in treatment planning and provision of care 

Responsibilities will include:

  • Psychiatric evaluations and medication management of patients
  • Prescribe, direct, and administer psychotherapeutic treatments and/or medications to treat mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders.
  • Collaborate with our team of professionals for best care practices in the treatment of adolescents, young adults and their families.

If this position is of interest to you, let’s talk! Please contact Jan Hamilton, PMHNP-BC, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, at Doorways LLC. [email protected]

 

Now Hiring: Licensed Professional Counselor

Doorways LLC. is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on 13-25 year olds and their families. Providers at Doorways specialize in treatment for Eating Disorders, Mood Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, OCD, ADD/ADHD, self-harm, suicide prevention, and family counseling.

We are seeking a full time or part time Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC, LMFT, or LCSW). To apply for this position please submit a cover letter, resume and salary requirement to [email protected]

Doorways provides a supportive, family-focused environment, flexible schedule, competitive salary and benefits, and a fun place to work!

Requirements:

  • Position requires a desire to work in a faith-based multidisciplinary practice with adolescents and their families in an outpatient setting.
  • Expectation of empaneling with at least one insurance company prior to start of employment.
  • Current CPR & First Aid Certifications
  • Fully licensed behavioral health counselor in the state of Arizona.
  • Minimum of three years experience working with 13-25 year old clients and their families.
  • Enthusiastic and positive personality!

Desired Skills and Experience:

  • Experience working with eating disorder clients and families preferred
  • Experience in treating OCD /Social Anxiety and use of ERP therapy preferred
  • Experience in leading DBT groups and working knowledge of DBT skills preferred
  • Energetic and passionate regarding working with the adolescent and young adult population
  • Possess excellent interpersonal skills and the desire to grow with a rapidly expanding practice
  • Team player willing to work with a multidisciplinary team of professionals in treatment planning and provision of care

Submit resume [email protected]

 

 

Now Hiring: Licensed Independent Substance Abuse Counselor (LISAC) or Licensed Associate Substance Abuse Counselor (LASAC)

Doorways LLC. is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on 13-25-year-olds and their families.

Doorways is growing! We are in the development stage of adding an adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program for substance abuse and will need excellent staff to lead this IOP.

We are seeking a full time or part time LISAC or LASAC (Licensed Independent Substance Abuse Counselor or Licensed Associate Substance Abuse Counselor) or a therapist (LPC, LMFT, LCSW) who has extensive experience with substance abuse treatment.

Doorways provides a supportive, family-focused environment, flexible schedule, competitive salary and benefits, and a fun place to work!

Requirements:

  • Position requires a desire to work in a faith-based multidisciplinary practice with adolescents and their families in an outpatient setting
  • Master’s degree in psychology, counseling, social work or related field
  • Current and valid associate or independent level license through the AZBBHE (LAC, LPC, LMSW, LCSW, LASAC, LISAC)
  • Proficient computer skills and a working knowledge of Microsoft office programs
  • Exceptional communication skills (written and verbal)
  • Current unrestricted AZ Level One Fingerprint Clearance Card; Current CPR & First Aid
  • Enthusiastic and positive personality!

Desired Skills and Experience:

  • Energetic and passionate regarding working with the adolescent and young adult population
  • Possess excellent interpersonal skills and the desire to grow with a rapidly expanding practice
  • Expectation of empaneling with at least one insurance company prior to start of employment if possible (dependent on licensure)
  • 1-3 years experience working with teen and young adult populations
  • Team player willing to work with a multidisciplinary team of professionals in treatment planning and provision of care

To apply for this position please submit a cover letter, resume, and salary requirement to [email protected]

Setting the Record Straight About ADHD

October is ADHD Awareness Month. As with many awareness months, this one comes with a different theme each year. This year’s theme is Setting the Record Straight, i.e., by sharing the facts and dispelling the myths about ADHD you can do your part to educate others about the issue.

Setting the record straight about ADHD

What is ADHD?

ADHD stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. It is a very common condition that is diagnosed mainly in young children and teens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2016 approximately 3.3 million children in the teenage years were diagnosed with ADHD. For a more comprehensive overview, check out CHADD — a website full of helpful and up to date information about ADHD/ADD.

What are the Symptoms of ADHD?

ADHD is a complex syndrome and how it manifests can differ between individuals. However, the main symptoms of ADHD are inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. These signs can manifest in different ways:

  • Being easily distracted.
  • Constant forgetfulness.
  • Persistent fidgeting and inability to be still.
  • Difficulty waiting for a turn.
  • Overvaluing immediate versus delayed rewards (delay discounting).

ADHD Myths and Misconceptions

Most of us have heard of ADHD, but we may not be aware of the many myths circulating about it. If you are the parent of a teen or young adult, it’s important to realize that misconceptions about ADHD shape how we think about, react to, and support those who have it or those we suspect may have it. Here are some of the more common myths followed by what is true about ADHD.

  • False: My adolescent is hyper, so they likely have ADHD – Teens are full of energy, and they can sometimes be rowdy. Although hyperactivity is one symptom of ADHD, if unruly behavior is the only symptom exhibited by your adolescent, then it’s best not to jump to the conclusion that they have ADHD.
  • False: My Adolescent has ADHD, so I must be a bad parent – Causes for any kind of mental disorder are difficult to pin down. The general consensus is that ADHD is rooted in brain chemistry. Certain individuals with genes that affect how the brain processes two neurotransmitters called norepinephrine and dopamine may be at an elevated risk for ADHD.
  • False: Teens with ADHD are only affected in school – ADHD and its symptoms aren’t limited to the classroom environment. However, ADHD does have an adverse effect on school performance and academic attainment.
  • False: ADHD affects only boys – ADHD is not limited to boys and it’s just as possible for girls to have it. The symptoms of ADHD are the same in both genders. But because of the persistence of this myth, boys are more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than girls.
  • False: Teens with ADHD will eventually outgrow it – Unfortunately, many adolescents diagnosed with ADHD will continue to exhibit symptoms throughout their twenties and on into full adulthood. Without help, they are highly vulnerable to a host of problems – anxiety, mood disorders, substance abuse, career difficulties, and troubled personal relationships.
  • False: ADHD medication turns adolescents into “zombies” – The term “drugged” often suggests lethargy and loss of capacity. In fact, the most commonly prescribed medications for ADHD typically do not have this effect. And, according to the CDC, between 70 to 80 percent of youngsters with ADHD have fewer symptoms when they take prescribed stimulants.
  • True: ADHD is a real mental disorder – A teen with ADHD has a diagnosable brain disorder. However, an accurate diagnosis will require observations by an ADHD expert of multiple symptoms in different settings and evidence of significant behavioral impairment.
  • True: ADHD diagnosis is on the rise – ADHD is one of the most prevalent psychiatric illnesses among young people. Various studies show that ADHD has been rising over the years, but the increase could be attributed to a tendency for medical professionals to indulge in over-diagnosis.
  • True: ADHD can lead to other disorders – Research suggests that teens with ADHD have an increased chance of developing other types of behavioral disorders and of developing substance abuse.
  • True: ADHD can be treated – Treatment of ADHD has been proven to be beneficial for many teens and young adults. For those with mild forms of ADHD, they can be symptom free after just a few years of treatment. However, others with more serious cases will continue to benefit from life-long treatment that enables them to manage their symptoms successfully.

Treatment for ADHD in Phoenix

If you’re unsure about whether your adolescent or young adult has ADHD, it’s best to have a consultation with a medical professional experienced in assessing ADHD and who can prescribe any necessary medication. Doorways offers therapy and counseling aimed at mitigating the symptoms of ADHD and any associated behavioral issues. We treat individuals in the 13-25 age group, so make an appointment with us for a free consultation.

8 Tips for Helping Your Teen Manage High School

8 tips for helping your teen manage high school

Has your adolescent moved on from middle school to high school? They may have looked forward to moving up a grade with their friends, but they may have also found the transition somewhat daunting and stressful. If some of your teen’s friends from middle school are attending the same high school, this will have made the move easier. However, there will still be a host of students they don’t know, a new school culture, more challenging classes and new social pressures – it’s a lot to cope with. So, here are eight tips on helping new high-schoolers navigate this milestone in their life.

  1. Establish a Consistent Homework Routine

Your teen needs a quiet spot without the distractions of phones, TV, loud music, and video games. While they may claim to be an expert multitasker, able to do homework while also checking their Facebook account, studies show that multitasking is not beneficial to studying. Setting up a regular time to do homework also helps. Encourage them to establish a daily homework agenda. Homework assignments, extracurricular activities and upcoming test dates may be available online so they can look ahead and plan more effectively.

  1. Teach Your Teen to Prioritize

If the high school workload is heavy, teach your teen to prioritize and do the most pressing or difficult homework first. This way, if everything doesn’t get finished, the most important assignments will have been completed. Many high schools post grades online, making it easy to go over grades and assignments every week. Praise should come first as your teen needs to know that you are proud of their successful efforts. After the praise, you can turn the discussion to any missing or late work and what can be done to improve.

  1. Encourage Your Teen to Learn Management Skills

Sometimes a large project may seem overwhelming especially if your teen is not organized and has trouble focusing. Teach them how to break the assignment down into more manageable pieces. You might begin with a brainstorming session one day, doing research the following day, writing a section the next day, and so on. The aim is to make the project seem much more doable. Your high schooler can keep an itemized list of the various steps and check each step off as it gets completed. Each time they put a tick next to a completed item, they will feel a sense of accomplishment and be less stressed about an impending deadline.

  1. Help Your Teen to Think Ahead

Forethought and focus aren’t always adolescent strong suits. Lack of preparation usually leads to disorganized mornings and rushing out the door to catch the school bus on time. More preparation the night before will mean less stress and more time for breakfast the following morning. Before going to bed, encourage thinking ahead. This could include laying out school clothes, packing up homework, and collecting musical instruments and sports equipment in one place. Remember that it can take many repetitions to turn actions into habits. It’s not helpful to nag or roll your eyes at their forgetfulness; it will just make them defensive.

  1. Focus on Ultimate Life Goals

Try to help your teen understand that the point of working hard in high school isn’t just to get good grades. It’s also about building towards a happy, fulfilling future. Encourage them to indulge in visions about their future and talk about the educational steps necessary to achieve their goals. Whatever you do, don’t discourage them by shooting down their dreams. Your student should also be encouraged to try different interests on for size.

  1. Listen to Your Teen’s Problems

Does your teen tell you that they hate school? Just as it’s not a good idea to do their homework for them, it’s best not to immediately supply solutions to any school problems they may be having. Instead, encourage them to think through the issues themselves by asking them what they think caused the problem, what they’ve done so far to deal with it, and what they plan to do next.

  1. Teach Your Teen to Deal with Failure

Failing at something is a necessary part of growing up. You can help your teen to handle failure by talking about your own past struggles and helping them to understand that even when things go badly, there are always other options and new opportunities to improve. Although your sympathy is important, don’t insulate them from all consequences. Teens who are protected from all the pain and anguish of failure are likely to react badly to misfortunes later in life.

  1. Address any Teen Problems Now

Many mental, emotional and physical challenges surface during the high school years. Addressing them when they first appear avoids being overwhelmed by them later when teens may not be able to fulfill educational goals. Many high schoolers with challenges can be helped and go on to become successful throughout high school, college and beyond. If you need professional guidance, Doorways is here for you. We want your teen to be successful, so make a no-cost, no-obligation appointment with us today.

5 Ways to Approach Your Teen About Drug Abuse

how to approach your teen about drug abuse

Unfortunately, teen substance abuse, including abuse related to prescription drugs, is a big problem currently. Parents may approach this in a variety of ways, some of which are more effective than others. Ineffective methods may only make things worse and cause unnecessary conflict between you and your teenager. So, if you suspect there is some substance abuse issue going on, here’s some advice on how to approach this.

  1. Acknowledge the Problem

You may be reluctant to face up to the fact that your teen could have a drug abuse problem, even though the signs of it lie right before your eyes. You may tell yourself things like “They’re just experimenting a little – it’s no big deal,” or “They just tried it once, but it’s not like they’re an addict.” Instead of doing your best to ignore the situation and hoping it will just go away, you need to conduct intentional conversations with your adolescent about the very real dangers of substance abuse.

  1. Be Your Teen’s Parent, Not Their Friend

It’s very likely that your adolescent has succumbed to peer pressure and that some of their friends are encouraging them to do drugs. Right now, your teenager needs a parent, not another friend. Yes, it’s necessary to invade your teen’s privacy by searching their room, car, and belongings for drugs and to explain to them they need to get help. You need to behave like a parent because your adolescent isn’t in a position to make the best decisions for themselves right now.

  1. Discuss the Issue When Your Teen is Not High

If your teen arrives home from a party and is obviously high, it won’t be productive to confront them when they’re incapable of listening to a reasoned conversation. Be patient and wait for a more appropriate time to talk about your concerns when your adolescent can be coherent and fully present for the discussion.

  1. Talk About the Problem When You’re Calm

I’m sure your discovery of your teenager’s drug use is eliciting a varied range of emotions – anger, fear, disappointment. It’s important to try not to let these feelings guide your conversations with your teen. Letting your discussions deteriorate into yelling matches won’t help – your adolescent will only become defensive and shut down. It’s much better to remain calm and talk to them about the changes you’ve observed in them and how concerned you are. You want to come across as a source of support rather than of guilt or shame.

  1. Acknowledge Any Family History

If there is a history of drug abuse in your family, try to educate your teen about their possible genetic vulnerability toward drug dependency. If you have personal experiences with recovery from substance abuse, share them with your adolescent. Don’t conceal valuable knowledge you’ve gained from experience in an effort to maintain a perfect family image. Your teen can learn from family mistakes, but only if you share them.

Where to Get Help for Teen Substance Abuse in Phoenix

If you think your adolescent has a substance abuse problem, it’s not something to ignore. You need to take action, have conversations with your teenager about their drug use, and make it clear that it’s a big deal. If you find you can’t cope on your own, Doorways is here to offer professional support for you and your teen. Arrange an initial no-charge consultation with us so that you and your adolescent can get the help you need as soon as possible.

8 Tips to Teach Time Management Skills to Your Teen

tips to teach time management skills to your teen

Does your teenager wait until the last possible moment to complete their high school English essay or math homework? High schoolers that don’t learn to manage their time well may end up as lifelong procrastinators. While handing in late homework with excuses to a lenient teacher might just get your teen a reprimand, future college professors and employers may not be so forgiving. And constantly rushing to get things done with only hours before the deadline can result in shoddy work, lack of sleep, and high stress levels.

What are the Benefits of Good Time Management for Teens?

Your adolescent may think the high school years are the busiest time in their life; they have no idea that the adult world can be even more hectic. So, it’s worthwhile to try to teach them how to manage their time more effectively now. The following are some benefits of good time management for teens.

  • Reduced stress and anxiety when exam dates are coming up or projects are due.
  • Better scholastic performance.
  • Improved decision-making skills.
  • Increased feelings of independence and responsibility.
  • More available time for relaxing with friends and family.

How Can I Teach my Teen Effective Time Management?

Your goal should be to encourage your adolescent to manage their time wisely without constant reminders from you to get the work done. Here are eight steps you can consider taking to teach them essential time management skills.

  1. Set a good example: If you’re always missing your own work deadlines or constantly running late, your teenager will get the impression that this is ok.
  2. Provide tools: Help your adolescent find the time management tools that work best for them, whether it’s a planner to write in or an app on their laptop.
  3. Teach prioritization: Encourage them to create a schedule that prioritizes what needs to be done.
  4. Help to solve conflicts: It’s common for high schoolers to have conflicting activities. A swim meet, a birthday party, or a church activity may all coincide. Sit down with them and talk about how to prioritize activities based on values and commitments.
  5. Encourage routines: Try getting your teen to establish healthy habits like doing their chores as soon as they arrive home from school. Once a routine is set into place, they won’t have to waste time thinking about what to do next.
  6. Avoid nagging: Although it may be tempting to keep reminding your teen about doing their homework or chores, if you overdo it, you are reducing their sense of responsibility.
  7. Set expectations: Come up with sensible, clear guidelines about the way you expect your adolescent to manage their time and follow through with consequences when necessary.
  8. Don’t forget about free time: Your teen’s schedule should not be so crowded with tasks that they have no time for some relaxation and fun.

Remember: Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day

Don’t expect your teenager to develop perfect time management skills overnight. There will be a learning curve and times when they will forget a deadline or miscalculate how long a project will take. Be patient, and, over time, you are sure to see results.

Impediments to Successful Time Management

If your teen has a problem that makes good time management too difficult or impossible, you need address the underlying issue first. Adolescents can have a variety of issues that will interfere with successful time management – substance abuse, depression, mood disorders, and attention deficit syndrome, to name a few. So, if your teen is struggling with one of the above and you live in or near Phoenix, schedule some time with Doorways for a free consultation to see how we can help them get their time management on track.

6 Tips for Parenting Your College Freshman

It’s happening – You’ve done your best to equip your teen with the necessary skills to not only survive but also thrive after high school, and now the moment has finally arrived when your eighteen-year-old is off to college. It may be a moment you’ve been dreading – your child leaving home. Worse, if your teen is an only child or the youngest, you also have to deal with that empty nest syndrome. Neither you nor your college freshman knows exactly how well this transition from home to college is going to go, so here are six pieces of helpful advice for you as a parent.

tips for parenting a college freshman

  1. Do Your Best to Let Go

College is but one more step that your teen is taking in their life, and they should be allowed to make their own decisions as much as possible. It’s somewhat of a balancing act – you want to provide enough direction, so your college student doesn’t feel they’ve been cast adrift in a boat without a rudder, while you also want to steer them toward making intelligent choices on their own.

  1. Let Your Teen Make Mistakes

Your college student will make mistakes. They may need to fall on their face and learn from what went wrong and get back up. This may sound harsh, but it’s the best way to learn valuable life lessons. Your challenge is to be supportive yet resist the temptation to turn into a helicopter parent hovering over every decision in an attempt to protect your teen from risk or failure.

  1. Don’t Fight Changes in Your Teen

First-year college life can be an exciting time for your freshman to discover deeper meaning and purpose. Be excited for your teen instead of worrying over how they may be changing. Freshman year of college is a time when your student may begin to question the interests, beliefs, and values they’ve brought with them from home and begin to change. This is a necessary and natural process of growing up.

  1. Expect a Possible Change in Career Interest

Don’t be alarmed if your college freshman expresses interest in a different career path from the one you thought was already set. It’s normal for college students to develop new interests and change their major. Many colleges acknowledge this by not requiring students to declare a major until their junior year. Of course, encourage your teen to discuss their choices with you, but in the end, it’s best to allow them to navigate their career choices on their own.

  1. Accept More Limited Contact with Your Teen

You may find your teen is only providing you snippets of information, where once you received whole chapters. To overcome this, try defining expectations for how you will stay in touch with your student. For instance, establish a regular time to talk by phone – this will alleviate worries when you haven’t heard from your teen in a while. A care package every now and then doesn’t hurt either.

  1. Anticipate a Different Relationship

The most challenging time for you and your new college student may be the summer after the freshman year when your teen comes home and you are struck by how they’ve changed. Your teen has been gone for a year, has matured, and now has a sense of belonging to a new community. If your freshman is at a college nearby, don’t be upset if they don’t come home every weekend. Your student needs the time to make friends, explore what the college offers and fully experience campus living.

Finally – Expect to Still Be Needed

While your student needs independence during their college journey, there will also be times when they need your help, advice, and support. It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with campus resources so that you can help direct your teen to the appropriate place if concerns arise. However, if your teenager or young adult is experiencing problems that you can’t cope with, you may need the help of a counselor who is trained to deal with college students. If you are in this situation, give Doorways a call. We want your student to enjoy their college life, and an initial consultation with us won’t cost you any extra tuition fees.