5 Ways to Approach Your Teen About Drug Abuse

how to approach your teen about drug abuse

Unfortunately, teen substance abuse, including abuse related to prescription drugs, is a big problem currently. Parents may approach this in a variety of ways, some of which are more effective than others. Ineffective methods may only make things worse and cause unnecessary conflict between you and your teenager. So, if you suspect there is some substance abuse issue going on, here’s some advice on how to approach this.

  1. Acknowledge the Problem

You may be reluctant to face up to the fact that your teen could have a drug abuse problem, even though the signs of it lie right before your eyes. You may tell yourself things like “They’re just experimenting a little – it’s no big deal,” or “They just tried it once, but it’s not like they’re an addict.” Instead of doing your best to ignore the situation and hoping it will just go away, you need to conduct intentional conversations with your adolescent about the very real dangers of substance abuse.

  1. Be Your Teen’s Parent, Not Their Friend

It’s very likely that your adolescent has succumbed to peer pressure and that some of their friends are encouraging them to do drugs. Right now, your teenager needs a parent, not another friend. Yes, it’s necessary to invade your teen’s privacy by searching their room, car, and belongings for drugs and to explain to them they need to get help. You need to behave like a parent because your adolescent isn’t in a position to make the best decisions for themselves right now.

  1. Discuss the Issue When Your Teen is Not High

If your teen arrives home from a party and is obviously high, it won’t be productive to confront them when they’re incapable of listening to a reasoned conversation. Be patient and wait for a more appropriate time to talk about your concerns when your adolescent can be coherent and fully present for the discussion.

  1. Talk About the Problem When You’re Calm

I’m sure your discovery of your teenager’s drug use is eliciting a varied range of emotions – anger, fear, disappointment. It’s important to try not to let these feelings guide your conversations with your teen. Letting your discussions deteriorate into yelling matches won’t help – your adolescent will only become defensive and shut down. It’s much better to remain calm and talk to them about the changes you’ve observed in them and how concerned you are. You want to come across as a source of support rather than of guilt or shame.

  1. Acknowledge Any Family History

If there is a history of drug abuse in your family, try to educate your teen about their possible genetic vulnerability toward drug dependency. If you have personal experiences with recovery from substance abuse, share them with your adolescent. Don’t conceal valuable knowledge you’ve gained from experience in an effort to maintain a perfect family image. Your teen can learn from family mistakes, but only if you share them.

Where to Get Help for Teen Substance Abuse in Phoenix

If you think your adolescent has a substance abuse problem, it’s not something to ignore. You need to take action, have conversations with your teenager about their drug use, and make it clear that it’s a big deal. If you find you can’t cope on your own, Doorways is here to offer professional support for you and your teen. Arrange an initial no-charge consultation with us so that you and your adolescent can get the help you need as soon as possible.