Central Phoenix Behavioral Health Networking Group Meeting

The goal of this group is to provide a platform for local providers to collaborate and exchange resources and information about services available in the Central Phoenix area for Behavioral Health. Each attendee will have the opportunity for a brief introduction to the group and to share information specific to their services.

Please RSVP as seating is limited.

CLICK TO REGISTER

We will be hosting this event on the following time, date, and location:

Tuesday, November 7, 2017 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM (MST)

Doorways
4747 N. 7th Street
Suite 450
Phoenix 85014

Arizona Association of School Psychologists 49th Annual Conference

Doorways is exhibiting at the Arizona Association of School Psychologists 49th Annual Conference

November 2 – 3, 2017

Exhibitor Hours
Thursday, November 2nd
7:30 am – 4:30 pm
Friday, November 3rd
7:30 am – 4:30 pm

Conference Location
Black Canyon Conference Center
9440 North 25th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85021
(602) 944-0569
The Vendor/Exhibitor Area is centrally located in the Conference Center
www.blackcanyonconferencecenter.com

 

Now Hiring: Licensed Professional Counselor or Psychologist

Doorways LLC. is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on 13-25 year olds and their families. Providers at Doorways specialize in treatment for Eating Disorders, Mood Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, OCD, ADD/ADHD, self-harm, suicide prevention, and family counseling.

We are seeking a full time or part time Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC, LMFT, or LCSW) or Psychologist. To apply for this position please submit cover letter, resume and salary requirement to [email protected]

Doorways provides a supportive, family-focused environment, flexible schedule, competitive salary and benefits, and a fun place to work!

Requirements:

  • Position requires a desire to work in a faith-based multidisciplinary practice with adolescents and their families in an outpatient setting.
  • Expectation of empaneling with at least one insurance company prior to start of employment.
  • Current CPR & First Aid Certifications
  • Fully licensed behavioral health counselor or psychologist in the state of Arizona.
  • Minimum of three years experience working with 13-25 year old clients and their families.
  • Enthusiastic and positive personality!

Desired Skills and Experience:

  • Experience working with eating disorder clients and families preferred
  • Experience in treating OCD /Social Anxiety and use of ERP therapy preferred
  • Experience in leading DBT groups and working knowledge of DBT skills preferred
  • Energetic and passionate regarding working with the adolescent and young adult population
  • Possess excellent interpersonal skills and the desire to grow with a rapidly expanding practice
  • Team player willing to work with a multidisciplinary team of professionals in treatment planning and provision of care

 

 

Doorways New Address

Doorways New AddressWe have moved!

Our new location is in Central Phoenix south of Camelback, north of Indian School, on the east side of the street.  We are across from Brophy.

Our new address is

4747 N. 7th St., Suite 450

Phoenix, Arizona 85014

Now Hiring: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner or Psychiatrist

Doorways LLC. is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on 13-25-year olds and their families.

Doorways provides a supportive, family-focused environment, flexible schedule, competitive salary and benefits, and a fun place to work!

Providers at Doorways specialize in treatment for eating disorders, mood disorders, anxiety/OCD, substance abuse, depression, ADD/ADHD, self-harm, suicide prevention, and family counseling.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Certification with current unrestricted license from the Arizona State Board of Nursing or Doctor of Medicine or Osteopathic Medicine with current unrestricted license from the Arizona State Board of Medical Examiners,
  • Current DEA License, NPI Number,
  • Three or more years’ experience in the delivery of mental health treatment for adolescents and young adults,
  • Current CPR & First Aid Certifications
  • Empaneled with at least one major insurance carrier in Arizona preferred.
  • Able to support a faith-based, holistic, integrated model of treatment
  • Energetic and passionate regarding working with the adolescent and young adult population
  • Possess excellent interpersonal skills and the desire to grow with a rapidly expanding practice
  • Team player willing to work with a multidisciplinary team of professionals in treatment planning and provision of care 

Responsibilities will include:

  • Psychiatric evaluations and medication management of patients
  • Prescribe, direct, and administer psychotherapeutic treatments and/or medications to treat mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders.
  • Collaborate with our team of professionals for best care practices in the treatment of adolescents, young adults and their families.

If this position is of interest to you, let’s talk! Please contact Jan Hamilton, PMHNP-BC, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, at Doorways LLC. [email protected]

 

Full-Time Front Office Administrator, Phoenix, Arizona

Doorways is a faith-based counseling organization in Phoenix, Arizona, that provides comprehensive outpatient treatment focused exclusively on treating teens and young adults ages 13-25.

Providers at Doorways specialize in treatment for eating disorders, mood disorders, anxiety/OCD, substance abuse, depression, ADD/ADHD, self-harm, suicide prevention and more.

Doorways is seeking a Full-Time Front Office Administrative Staff person (32-40 hours per week).

Ideal Candidate:

  • Minimum 3-5 years experience administrating front office duties in a mental health or medical private practice with multiple providers.
  • A team oriented perspective, friendly personality, great people skills, excellent communication skills, energetic, and ability to multi-task in a busy office.

Responsibilities: Duties will include, but are not limited to, working with the front office team on the following:

  • Interacting with clients and staff, checking in/out clients
  • Working with an electronic health records and practice management system
  • Collecting/processing/posting payments/EOBs
  • Scheduling appointments for multiple providers
  • Demonstrating excellent phone etiquette
  • Utilizing knowledge and experience in commercial insurance processes/billing

To apply for this position, please submit cover letter, resume and salary requirements to Human Resources.

For more information about Doorways go to http://www.doorwaysarizona.com.

Anxiety Disorders/OCD IOP

The Anxiety Disorders/OCD IOP (Intensive Outpatient Program) at Doorways is a group therapy program for teens who are struggling with the following issues or symptoms:

  • School avoidance/ refusal
  • Specific phobias (fear of vomiting, fear of spiders/animals, fear of elevators, etc.)
  • Panic attacks, panic disorder
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

The Anxiety Disorders/OCD Intensive Outpatient Program is held three days per week.

  • Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
  • 4:00pm -7:00 pm.

Our IOP groups are contracted with Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, and United Behavioral Healthcare.

For more information about IOP, contact our IOP coordinator at 602-997-2880 or [email protected].

Our IOP programs are run by certified Anxiety Disorders/OCD experts!

Here’s a typical session at our Anxiety Disorders/OCD IOP.

The first hour of our IOP are group sharing times. Members share and celebrate their successes and challenges with anxiety since the last group and offer each other feedback.

Then the remainder of the group we engage in fun and creative tasks to help adolescents face their fears.

These serve a purpose in challenging the social anxiety and OCD symptoms that keep adolescents from functioning in their world.We might play a game of charades, lip-syncing contests or practice doing every day activities that they might avoid.

We also go offsite and participate in activities that normally would cause us to feel extreme anxiety, but by doing it as a group in a safe setting, we learn how to overcome those feelings. For example, we recently went to a pumpkin patch and participated in a maze to challenge particular fears. We also go to malls or restaurants and plan social activities.

Managing Back-To-School Anxiety And Pressure

For teenagers returning to high school, or young adults beginning college, starting a new school year often comes with a lot of stress and anxiety.

Gone are the days of a relaxing summer spent with friends outdoors and easy-going vacation time. With today’s competitive society, many teens and young adults feel pressure to find an internship, practice for standardized tests, or continue to study through the summer. Add to that the pressure of social media, with many experiencing the feeling of FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) when seeing all the fun things their peers are doing during the summer. It can lead to feelings of self-doubt and worry.

A parent might begin to see some troubling patterns emerge from their anxious teen. Patterns of anxiety can be internalized or externalized. Internalized anxiety may include insomnia, excessive headaches or stomachaches, changes in eating, moodiness, and lashing out. Externalizing anxiety can include partying, consuming alcohol, doing drugs, playing hours of video games, or watching TV excessively.

When should a parent be concerned? It’s the duration of the behavior that can be troubling. A headache from stress is normal. When it is days or weeks of headaches, or other troubling behavior, it’s time to intervene. Here are some suggestions to help guide your teen with stress:

  • Make sure your teen or young adult is getting the sleep they need. According to the National Sleep Foundation, teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night to function best. Most teens do not get enough sleep — one study found that only 15% reported sleeping 8 1/2 hours on school nights. Getting the right amount of sleep will help with their mood and agitation level.
  • Manage your own expectations and stress. It’s okay if your teen doesn’t make the team or get the lead in the play. Don’t allow your own stress to become theirs. Being a parent means helping your teen overcome failure and disappointment. They will face many challenges going forward in life, so this is the time to help them cope with issues as they arise.
  • Keep the lines of communication open. Help them navigate their feelings of being happy, sad, disappointed, frustrated, etc. Don’t just ask them about their studies or grades. Ask them how they felt about their day. Ask leading questions that will encourage dialog and sharing.
  • For teens still living at home, limit their digital time. Being connected at all hours to social media, or the internet, can compound the feelings of stress or inadequacy. It can also lead to “digital insomnia”, whereas the light from televisions, phones, and computers is processed by our bodies is similar to the way we process daylight. This leads back to teens not getting the sleep they need to be healthy and less stressed.
  • Set your teen up for success with goals and achievements they can accomplish. This will help build their self-esteem and guide them through the feelings of inadequacy. Creating mini-goals that are not time consuming, but affirming their skills and knowledge, will help them feel good about their achievements.
  • If your teen has turned to drinking or drugs to deal with the stress and anxiety, it may be time to get professional help. According to The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA), the studies found that highly stressed teens, compared to low-stressed teens are much more likely to become involved in substance abuse. If you see troubling behavior that suggests problems with alcohol or drugs, get help immediately.

Going back to school, or starting a new one, is never easy for teens and young adults. As with any new beginning, it can lead to stress and worry, which are expected. By guiding your teen, being alert to their behavior, and keeping the lines of communication open, it can be the start of a whole new adventure on the path to success.

 

 

 

What Parents of Young Teens Need to Know About Crushes

As a mom to an adult daughter, I am no stranger to the phenomena of having a crush. Oh, I can remember the whole experience…. the ups, the downs, the laughter, and the tears.

As the parent of a young teen, it’s important that we know how to deal with a crush when it happens because it’s a normal part of adolescence.  Love…. there’s nothing like it.

Teenage crushes are a normal experience during adolescence. There are generally two kinds of crushes – identity crushes and romantic crushes. In both cases, the teen is captivated by a person and wants their attention. These feelings can be very powerful for a teenager, and it’s important for parents to understand this as they go through this experience.

Crushes can, though, cause problems with your teen. They might become so fixated on their crush that it can affect their schoolwork. They might forgo their friends to spend time with their crush and some teens will drop out of after school activities to focus their energy on their first love. While these are matters of concern, a parent must be more concerned that their teen, or the crush, does not develop an obsessive love. When teens begin to act in irresponsible ways, it may be time for some intervention.  Here’s how to help and support a teen experiencing a crush.

  1. Open the lines of communication. Seek to understand what your child likes about the other person. What draws them to them. What things do they like to do together?  Encourage your child to invite their crush over to hang out with your family.
  2. Establish dating rules for your teen. Dating rules might sound old-fashioned, but there is a good reason for them as the protect our children and the person they are dating. For example, our rule at our house was that our teens could not be at home without an adult present. Nor were they allowed to go into their bedroom alone.  While your teen will probably complain about these rules, “You don’t trust me,” your response should be simple and to the point. “it’s not that I don’t trust you, it’s that I understand temptation. It’s a powerful emotion. And it’s better to not put yourself in the path of temptation. That protects everybody.”
  3. Encourage group dates. Group dates can be a lot of fun, as well as a safe environment for interaction.
  4. Establish clear boundaries when it comes to texting and online communication. Once you post a picture or text online it is there forever. Even if you use snapchat. Educate your child on the importance of their online reputation for their future college or career hunt and how important it is to protect that reputation. What happens if you send a photo or a message to your love in trust but the that person shares the message. or their phone gets stolen by their bratty little brother and he shares your messages to the world. Better to be safe than sorry by not sending any texts, images or messages that you wouldn’t want the world to see.

There are many more rules than parents can establish when it comes to crushes.  Work with your teen to set some boundaries that are appropriate for them and your family. Keep the lines of communication open.  Crushes can be the best of times or the worst of times, but for sure they will be a growing experience for your child and your family.